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The 6 Types of Windshield Breaks And How They Impact the Repair Strategy

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If you need advice on how to tackle the different types of windshield breaks, you need to know what to look for. With the price of replacing a windshield getting more exorbitantly expensive, most people are left with only one option: an auto glass business that has a windshield repair kit. We know that finding the best windshield crack repair kit for your customers can take a bit of homework to find, but it can go much more smoothly when you know exactly which windshield repair technology works best for which type of damage.

The Six Kinds Of Breaks
Each tiny stone impact on your windshield will cause two kinds of damage, either an edge crack or a stone-break - commonly called a chip. Then there are different types of cracks and stone-breaks. These are the six kinds you are likely to deal with on your windshield.

  • Surface Pit: These are typically the size of a pinhead and can be repaired but not charged for especially not billed to an insurance company because it technically is not a break.They only involve a chip in the glass that not extended into the middle tension zone has been removed a minute piece of glass to form a very small crater, or a 'pit'.
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  • Bullseye: This kind of break looks like it sounds. A circular cone shaped break that usually stems from a small rock kicked up by traffic that collides with your windshield. These are larger than surface pits and can always be repaired with a windshield crack repair kit and never require a glass replacement. This is the only break that a DIY (do-it-yourself) kit can effectively repair. The bullseye was very common when windshields were thicker. Nowadays the outer lite is only 2mm thick and combination breaks more often bullseyes.
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  • Half Moon: These are essentially half a bullseye and leave the same black-like appearance, but they aren't circular but shaped like a half moon instead.
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  • Star Break: Much like different types of bullseye breaks, a star break leaves an indentation at the impact site. The difference is the outward break pattern which here takes the appearance of a star. Straight cracks come out of the center of the crater rather than circles. This can be more time consuming to repair than bullseyes.
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  • Cracks: When you see a straight single line in your windshield, this is a crack. 9 out of 10 will be coming off the edge of the windshield called an edge crack. Edge cracks are easy to repair up to about 18 inches long with the right tools and resins. The other crack is called a floater crack. This one is a chip or stone-break that cracked out. This crack will not run to the edge of the windshield. The floater crack is more time consuming to repair and takes more crack-opener tools than an edge crack.
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  • Combination Break: These are the most visible of all breaks and cracks after repair. A combination break is where you see a round shaped bullseyes break with a star-break inside of it. It will often have crushed glass around the impact point. This break should not be repaired if it is in the driver's vision.

The best types of windshield crack repair resin to use for repairing glass can vary. Viscosity plays a big role in how restorative the resin will be. Less viscous resins will work alright for smaller dings, but you will need much more viscous and resilient resin for professional jobs. In addition, long cracks will require specific types of tools and resins that are in our windshield crack repair kits, whereas bullseyes, stars, combination breaks and other small chips can be restored with our standard windshield repair kits.

Always evaluate a break or crack before rendering services to repair it, because sometimes the windshield must be replaced.


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References

   FAQ
   Before/After Photos
   Incorrect Resin Photos
   Correct Resin Photos
   Fundamentals of Windshield Repair Adhesives
   Repairable Windshield Damage
   Windshields are Made to Crack
   Windshields Repair Standard (ROLAGS)

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